Pollinator Patch

Celebrating Pollinator Week all year round!

Gulf Frittilary

Celebrate!

Each day during Pollinator Week we will highlight a group of pollinators and provide information and activities so that you can learn more and take part in pollinator conservation!

Solitary Bees

Bumble Bees

Hummingbirds

Butterflies & Moths

Beetles & Ants

Wasps

Flies

Create Pollinator Habitat!

Thinking of creating pollinator habitat?  Check out these resources for good information about plants, pollinators, and sources for you!

Okies for Monarchs

Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation

Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture

Establishing a Pollinator Meadow by Priscilla Crawford, Conservation Specialist (PDF of Power Point Presentation)

(See the recorded presentation below!)

Order Poster

Pollinator Poster

About

National Pollinator Week is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what you can do to protect them!

Thirteen years ago the U.S. Senate unanimously approved and designated a week in June as “National Pollinator Week.” This was a small symbolic step toward addressing declining pollinator populations.  Pollinator Week has now grown into an international celebration of the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats, beetles, and other bugs!

Leafcutter Bee

Why Conserve Pollinators?

Pollinators are essential for both native habitats and agricultural systems. A diversity of pollinators means that a diversity of wild and domesticated plants are able to reproduce. Recent reports of the decline in pollinator populations raises concern for native plant diversity, ecosystem stability, and food production. The loss of pollinators is caused by a combination of several circumstances: habitat loss and fragmentation, pesticide use, increased diseases, invasive species, and climate change.

Most pollinators are attracted to plants because they receive food in the form of nectar or pollen from the flower. Pollinating, or moving pollen from flower to flower, is not directly important to the pollinator. However, movement of pollen helps to mix the genetic material of the plant species. Most flowering species require pollination to grow viable seeds and fruits. Just like the plants in your garden need pollination to produce beans or peppers, native plants need pollination to make sunflower seeds or blackberries. Pollinators help plants maintain genetic diversity and boost reproduction in both native and domesticated plant populations.

The honey bee is the most iconic pollinator on Earth, but it can’t do the work alone. Native pollinators are necessary to pollinate the diversity of our native plants. We need all these little animals – butterflies, wasps, bees, flies, beetles, ants, moths – to help the thousands of plant species that make up our native habitats.

Potter Wasp

Follow our Facebook Page to join our live expert chats and virtual field trips.

Schedule

Mon. June 22

Wild Bees of Oklahoma City Zoo, Jose Montalva, ECU Dept. of Biology & OU Dept. of Geography

Wed. June 24

Pollinator (and other small wildlife) Photography, Bryan Reynolds, Nature Photographer

Thurs. June 25

2:00 Public Urban Pollinator Gardens, Vonceil Harmon, ODOT Natural Resources Program Biologist

Fri. June 26

2:00 Planning a Front Yard Pollinator Meadow, Priscilla Crawford, OBS Conservation Specialist

Photographs

Bryan Reynolds generously donated his photographs for our pollinator outreach.

Virtual Field Trip Recordings

Wild Bees of Oklahoma City Zoo, Jose Montalva, ECU Dept. of Biology & OU Dept. of Geography

Wed. June 24

Pollinator (and other small wildlife) Photography, Bryan Reynolds, Nature Photographer


Thurs. June 25

Right-of-Way Habitat and Public Urban Gardens for Pollinators, Vonceil Harmon & Kenny McMahon, ODOT Natural Resources Program Biologists

Fri. June 26

Planning a Front Yard Pollinator Meadow, Priscilla Crawford, OBS Conservation Specialist